Bah-weep-Graaaaagnah wheep ni ni bong

carry-on-wayward-fallen-angel:

finepieceofcas:

a genderqueer superhero who wears a binder and hides their face so everyone assumes they’re male but then they have c cups and never bind as a civilian so their secret identity is safe

Actually theres an Argentinian comic/tv show called Cybersix thats pretty much exactly this, except the other way around:

"Cybersix" (superhero persona)

image

image

"Adrien Seidelman" (civilian persona)

image

image

i believe all the episodes are on youtube if you want to watch it…

thedisneyfan:

matching icons for u and ur friends

anotheramazedperson:

Fanboy Drift is my favourite kind of Drift

If you are a writer, and you have a novel idea that you are excited about writing, write it. Don’t go on message boards and ask random Internet denizens whether or not something is allowed. … Who is the writer here? YOU ARE. Whose book is it? YOUR BOOK. There are no writing police. No one is going to arrest you if you write a teen vampire novel post Twilight. No one is going to send you off to a desert island to live a wretched life of worm eating and regret because your book includes things that could be seen as cliché.

If you have a book that you want to write, just write the damn thing. Don’t worry about selling it; that comes later. Instead, worry about making your book good. Worry about the best way to order your scenes to create maximum tension, worry about if your character’s actions are actually in character; worry about your grammar. DON’T worry about which of your stylistic choices some potential future editor will use to reject you, and for the love of My Little Ponies don’t worry about trends. Trying to catching a trend is like trying to catch a falling knife—dangerous, foolhardy, and often ending in tears, usually yours.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t pay attention to what’s getting published; keeping an eye on what’s going on in your market is part of being a smart and savvy writer. But remember that every book you see hitting the shelves today was sold over a year ago, maybe two. Even if you do hit a trend, there’s no guarantee the world won’t be totally different by the time that book comes out. The only certainty you have is your own enthusiasm and love for your work. …

If your YA urban fantasy features fairies, vampires, and selkies and you decide halfway through that the vampires are over-complicating the plot, that is an appropriate time to ax the bloodsuckers. If you decide to cut them because you’re worried there are too many vampire books out right now, then you are betraying yourself, your dreams, and your art.

If you’re like pretty much every other author in the world, you became a writer because you had stories you wanted to tell. Those are your stories, and no one can tell them better than you can. So write your stories, and then edit your stories until you have something you can be proud of. Write the stories that excite you, stories you can’t wait to share with the world because they’re just so amazing. If you want to write Murder She Wrote in space with anime-style mecha driven by cats, go for it. Nothing is off limits unless you do it badly.

And if you must obsess over something, obsess over stuff like tension and pacing and creating believable characters. You know, the shit that matters. There are no writing police. This is your story, no one else’s. Tell it like you want to.

Rachel Aaron (via relatedworlds)

Yeah, so, this answers a lot of asks I get. It’s also why YW focuses on technique and style, and less on content and research.

(via clevergirlhelps)

This is so important

(via freddlounds)

ringingallover:

meecheee123:

ringingallover:

do centaur babies suckle from the horse nipples or the human nipples tho

Centaurs aren’t real. Do you understand that?

yes that is why i made a tumblr post about this instead of just asking a real centaur

Me: *is home alone*
Me: MEGATRON HAS LEFT THE HOUSE. I, STARSCREAM NOW LEAD THE DECEPTICONS

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!

kireinahana:

thirp:

I don’t know why but this looks to me like I’m on an operation table receiving surgery from cats

Nevermind this is it

kireinahana:

thirp:

I don’t know why but this looks to me like I’m on an operation table receiving surgery from cats

Nevermind this is it

kireinahana:

spoken-not-written:

stunningpicture:

When radiologists take a selfie

dead

Wait I’ve seen this

kireinahana:

spoken-not-written:

stunningpicture:

When radiologists take a selfie

dead

Wait I’ve seen this

stirringwind:

actuallytroybolton:

banshelydia:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is really important because I didn’t realize there was a difference and other people should know this 

This is so cool

this is a great post because it shows the diversity in how women dress across the Islamic world, but I want to point out the limitations of this chart is that NOT all women in all these countries wear the head covering depicted. You often see a variety of different head coverings in every country, and it’s inaccurate to think that’s the only style worn. Even amongst Muslim women, how much hair or their face they cover is VARIED within each country and even Islamic sect. While this graphic is a great resource to give you an idea of popular ways for many women in each country cover their hair/face for religious reasons, it’s not as though the variety of Islamic headcoverings is country-specific, as some people might interpret this chart to mean.
For example, the picture of “Afghanistan”- that’s a burqa. While it’s true a lot of Afghan women wear burqas, not all do. 
These are ALL photos of Aghan women voting:



(x)(x)(x)
 Or in Iran- the graphic shows a hijab. While indeed it’s quite fashionable for many women to wear the headscarf in a manner that shows some of their hair peeking out in the front like this, others ensure they don’t let a single strand show. as this photo shows: 

Others wear a chador too, which is a the long black robe you see a number of women in this photo wearing while queuing to vote- I like this picture because it shows the diversity of how Iranian women dress. 

(x)(x)
This is just so that when you see a woman wearing a headscarf that shows her face and some hair, it doesn’t mean she couldn’t be from Afghanistan. Or if you see a woman wearing a long, black chador that hides her figure, she could very well be from Iran. This goes for the other countries featured here- I’ve seen Syrian and Egyptian women wear a huge variety of head coverings for example. I’ve seen Indonesian Muslim women who don’t wear a headscarf at all. So while some head coverings are more common in each country, it’s not very uniform even within a country, and it usually comes down to each woman’s personal preference.

stirringwind:

actuallytroybolton:

banshelydia:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is really important because I didn’t realize there was a difference and other people should know this 

This is so cool

this is a great post because it shows the diversity in how women dress across the Islamic world, but I want to point out the limitations of this chart is that NOT all women in all these countries wear the head covering depicted. You often see a variety of different head coverings in every country, and it’s inaccurate to think that’s the only style worn. Even amongst Muslim women, how much hair or their face they cover is VARIED within each country and even Islamic sect. While this graphic is a great resource to give you an idea of popular ways for many women in each country cover their hair/face for religious reasons, it’s not as though the variety of Islamic headcoverings is country-specific, as some people might interpret this chart to mean.

For example, the picture of “Afghanistan”- that’s a burqa. While it’s true a lot of Afghan women wear burqas, not all do. 

These are ALL photos of Aghan women voting:

(x)(x)(x)

Or in Iran- the graphic shows a hijab. While indeed it’s quite fashionable for many women to wear the headscarf in a manner that shows some of their hair peeking out in the front like this, others ensure they don’t let a single strand show. as this photo shows: 

Others wear a chador too, which is a the long black robe you see a number of women in this photo wearing while queuing to vote- I like this picture because it shows the diversity of how Iranian women dress. 

(x)(x)

This is just so that when you see a woman wearing a headscarf that shows her face and some hair, it doesn’t mean she couldn’t be from Afghanistan. Or if you see a woman wearing a long, black chador that hides her figure, she could very well be from Iran. This goes for the other countries featured here- I’ve seen Syrian and Egyptian women wear a huge variety of head coverings for example. I’ve seen Indonesian Muslim women who don’t wear a headscarf at all. So while some head coverings are more common in each country, it’s not very uniform even within a country, and it usually comes down to each woman’s personal preference.